Translation of library in Spanish:

library

Pronunciation: /ˈlaɪbreri; ˈlaɪbrəri/

n (pl -ries)

  • 1.1 (room, building) biblioteca (f) public/town library biblioteca pública/municipal (before n) library book libro (m) de la biblioteca library card o ticket (BrE) tarjeta (f) or (Méx) credencial (f) de lector library editionedición especial para bibliotecas library paste (AmE) cola (f) blanca
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    • I researched sailboat building at our town library and Boston Public Library.
    • So a university gets a new library building but no funds for new books.
    • It's easier to borrow the book from a public library or buy it from a second-hand bookshop.
    More example sentences
    • The bedrooms are linked to the bathrooms, dressing rooms, libraries and anterooms.
    • Along the cool corridors are private dining rooms, libraries, a gymnasium, and Turkish baths.
    • Dominic's room was more like a hotel luxury suite complete with a living room and a private library.
    1.2 (collection — of books) biblioteca (f); (— of pictures) archivo (m) fotográfico; (— of films) filmoteca (f); (— of records) discoteca (f); (— of newspapers) hemeroteca (f) a library of programs [Comput] una colección de programas (before n) library pictures [TV] imágenes (fpl) de archivo
    More example sentences
    • The museum houses a library with about 60,000 books related to Gandhi and the various causes he espoused.
    • A few Italian book collectors began to amass libraries of unprecedented proportions: one cardinal is said to have had as many as 15,000 books.
    • They visited the stables, admiring the horses, and settled in to read from the extensive library Geoff had collected.
    More example sentences
    • This includes photo libraries, research databases and detailed archives.
    • The archive functions as a dance library and research center, much like the New York City Public Library's Dance Collection.
    • Start your library by researching other denominational hymnals.

Definition of library in:

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Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.