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liquor

Pronunciation: /ˈlɪkər; ˈlɪkə(r)/

Translation of liquor in Spanish:

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (alcohol) alcohol (masculine), bebidas (feminine plural) alcohólicas hard liquor bebidas (feminine plural) (alcohólicas) fuertes, bebidas (feminine plural) espirituosas
    Example sentences
    • But men are more likely to order alcohol in casual dining restaurants; both men and women drink liquor and wine.
    • People don't realize that if they order a tall drink they're getting the same amount of liquor as a short drink.
    • At the bar, look for upscale liquor and signature drinks along with a variety of tapas.
    1.2 (British English/inglés británico) [Cookery/Cocina] jugo (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • These had been slightly glazed with concentrated poaching liquor and dusted with what tasted like ground-down, caramelised peach crisps.
    • A lot of popular spicy dishes require the ingredients to be marinated in a liquor for a few hours or overnight.
    Example sentences
    • They are more similar to dried beans than either crowder or black-eyed peas, and make a clear liquor when cooked.
    • Imagine you are making jam and have gotten to the point where you pour the steaming liquor of fruit, sugar, and pectin into the jars.
    • Strain over a wide jug and retain the liquor, discarding the peppercorns.

Definition of liquor in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.