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loosen

Pronunciation: /ˈluːsn/

Translation of loosen in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (partially dislodge) [tooth] aflojar 1.2 (make less tight) [collar/knot/bolt] aflojar, soltar* I had to loosen my belt tuve que aflojarme el cinturón she loosened her grip on the steering wheel dejó de apretar con tanta fuerza el volante it loosens the bowels tiene efecto laxante 1.3 (make less compact) [soil] aflojar
    Example sentences
    • The girl to our right, in complementary pinks and peach colors, lifts her face as she loosens the tight black collar around her neck.
    • She shook her head in acknowledgment, and went to Glory, loosening the tied reins.
    • His fingers threaded through her tight chignon and loosened it.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • [knot/bolt] aflojarse, soltarse*
    Example sentences
    • At the end of the holiday, I was starting to feel the knots in my shoulders loosen and my mind start to clear after all the drama and stress of the past few months.
    • Her head rested on his shoulder and her body loosened.
    • Amy's shoulders loosened and Hart gently trod back to sit quietly by her side.

Phrasal verbs

loosen up

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio 1.1 (physically) entrar en calor 1.2 (emotionally) relajarse 1.1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 2.1 (physically) [muscles] desentumecer* 2.2 (emotionally) hacer* relajar

Definition of loosen in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Sherry is produced in an area of chalky soil known as albariza lying between the towns of Puerto de Santa María, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and Jerez de la Frontera in Cádiz province. It is from Jerez that sherry takes its English name. Sherries, made from grape varieties including Palomino and Pedro Ximénez, are drunk worldwide as an aperitif, and in Spain as an accompaniment to tapas. The styles of jerez vary from the pale fino and manzanilla to the darker aromatic oloroso and amontillado.