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mailbox

Pronunciation: /ˈmeɪlbɑːks; ˈmeɪlbɒks/

Translation of mailbox in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (for receiving mail) (American English/inglés norteamericano) buzón (masculine), casillero (masculine) (Venezuela)
    Example sentences
    • If you suspect mail theft, get a lockable mailbox or rent a Post Office box.
    • The mailbox on its wooden post had been re-decorated numerous times, each time being adorned with a different design.
    • Several mailboxes to serve adjacent properties were placed under a roofed structure on the sidewalk across the road from the house.
    1.2 (for sending mail) (American English/inglés norteamericano) buzón (masculine) (de correos)
    Example sentences
    • He sealed, addressed, and stamped it before tucking it under his pocket and going for a brief walk down to the nearest public mailbox.
    • Plus, I also have to have a reason to get out of the house so I can drop it off in a public mailbox.
    • American postage stamps honouring the occasion mark the envelopes of Christmas cards that I cannot send from La Guardia Airport because the slots on all mailboxes are welded shut in the airport.
    1.3 (electronic) buzón (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • Email systems store messages in mailboxes with electronic addresses, which receivers check from time to time.
    • When I make a mistake, my mailbox begins filling with emails from readers within a few short minutes - and I almost always fix up the problem straight away.
    • Spam is up fivefold over the past 18 months, leaving the electronic mailboxes of Internet users jammed with billions of unwanted commercial e-mails.

Definition of mailbox in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.