Translation of mandate in Spanish:

mandate

Pronunciation: /ˈmændeɪt/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (authority) mandato (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Newly elected ministers invariably choose to regard an election victory as conferring a mandate on their policies.
    • Perhaps politicians should seek a new mandate from the electorate if they are unable to fulfil their promises.
    • The ones who win and form the next government would thus have the mandate to pursue their policies and programmes.
    1.2 (trusteeship) [History/Historia] mandato (masculine) under UN mandate bajo mandato de la ONU the British mandate in Palestine el protectorado or mandato británico de Palestina
    More example sentences
    • A forged cheque is not a valid mandate, and the bank cannot debit the customer's account.
    • If that were right one would expect to see wives being independently advised before signing a typical mandate for a joint account.
    • He showed his value pretty quickly, pointing out that banks must have a legal mandate to debit someone's account.
    More example sentences
    • For the next 25 years, Syria was governed by French colonial administrators under a mandate from the League of Nations.
    • Another category of dependent imperial territory was formed by League of Nations mandates.
    • After the war, Japan continued to rule the islands under a mandate from the League of Nations.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 [delegate] (instruct) dar* instrucciones a; (authorize) autorizar* the delegates were mandated to … los delegados recibieron instrucciones or recibieron el mandato de … 1.2 (make compulsory) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [attendance/procedure/payment] exigir* 1.3 [History/Historia] Palestine was mandated to the British in 1922 en 1922 se concedió el mandato de Palestina a Gran Bretaña mandated territory territorio (masculine) bajo mandato

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.