Translation of meat in Spanish:

meat

Pronunciation: /miːt/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 u and c carne (feminine) a plate of cold o cooked meats un plato de fiambres the meat and potatoes (American English/inglés norteamericano) lo básico a meat and potatoes repertoire un repertorio básico to be meat and drink to sb ser* la pasión de algn to be strong meat ser* demasiado fuerte one man's meat is another man's poison lo que a uno cura a otro mata (before noun/delante del nombre) meat by-product derivado (masculine) de la carne meat extract extracto (masculine) de carne meat industry industria (feminine) cárnica or de la carne meat pie pastel (masculine) de carne meat product producto (masculine) cárnico or de la carne
    More example sentences
    • The principal meats were pork, beef, mutton, and sometimes freshwater fish taken from the river.
    • The highly processed food and low-quality meats affect the health, both physical and mental, of everyone here.
    • He could smell the meats and the foods cooking on the hot plates above him, and he felt his stomach growl.
    1.2 uncountable/no numerable (substance) sustancia (feminine), enjundia (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Disc Two is where the meat of the supplements is featured.
    • They are dialogue-heavy, but they are laying the groundwork for the real meat of the film.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.