Translation of meltdown in Spanish:

meltdown

Pronunciation: /ˈmeltdaʊn/

noun/nombre

  • 1 [Physics/Física][ fusión accidental del núcleo de un reactor ]
    More example sentences
    • I was 21 years old and it was three days after the partial meltdown of the reactor core.
    • Some nuclear critics had asserted that a core meltdown would inevitably breach containment.
    • A year ago one of the company's nuclear plants came dangerously close to a core meltdown.
  • 2 [Finance] (crash) colapso (masculine), debacle (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • It's been a long time since I've had a major meltdown, and this time it was just about a puppy.
    • Perhaps the most critical lesson learned from last year, however, is the heavy price corporate reputations pay for such meltdowns.
    • While no one expects hedge-fund values to be listed in the daily newspapers, everyone would be relieved if fewer meltdowns appeared in the headlines.

Definition of meltdown in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.