Translation of migrate in Spanish:

migrate

Pronunciation: /ˈmaɪgreɪt; maɪˈgreɪt/

vi

  • 1.1 [Zool] emigrar
    More example sentences
    • In eastern North America, over two-thirds of breeding bird species migrate.
    • Magnetic cues, which help many bird species migrate, appear to be particularly important to Bobolinks.
    • In the fall, Bermuda is a rest stop for birds migrating from Canada to South America.
    1.2 [people] emigrar
    More example sentences
    • Most of the farmers migrated to the area in the 1970s, following the paths opened by oil companies.
    • Their women, who did not bind their feet, worked beside them in the fields and often tended the farms while their husbands migrated to the mines or to man ships, burn charcoal, or emigrate.
    • Many villages in the regency are devoid of young people as they have all migrated to Medan, Jakarta, Surabaya and other urban areas due to a lack of jobs at home.

vt

  • [Comput] migrar
    More example sentences
    • After all, StarOffice is free, and is more about getting computer users to migrate from Windows than anything else.
    • Stalker realizes many users will be migrating from another system, such as an IMAP or POP server.
    • When TMC went out of business, users had to migrate to different systems that had less sophisticated software as well as different hardware architecture.
    More example sentences
    • The market seems to approve: handset manufacturers including Nokia, Sendo and Sony Ericsson have said they will migrate their signing programs to Symbian Signed.
    • Smaller software vendors in particular said they were unable to migrate applications to Linux, simply because they lack open source knowledge.
    • And lo and behold, Oracle has a major U2 software house migrating all of its applications to Oracle.

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peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.