There are 2 translations of molar in Spanish:

molar1

Pronunciation: /ˈməʊlər; ˈməʊlə(r)/

n

  • [Dentistry/Odontología] muela (f), molar (m) [formal]
    More example sentences
    • The teeth most often missing are the third molars, second premolars, and maxillary lateral incisors, and other teeth may be reduced in size.
    • The location of early caries is found most often in children's maxillary incisors and first molars.
    • The medical name for wisdom teeth is the third molars.

Definition of molar in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of molar in Spanish:

molar2

adj

  • [Chemistry/Química] molar
    More example sentences
    • The enthalpy change that occurs during the complete combustion of one mole of a substance is called the molar heat of combustion, symbolized H c o.
    • Uncharged polar and even ionic dyes with substantial molar weights have often been used to trace apoplastic water movement.
    • Another substantial advantage is that volume fractions and molar concentrations are easily interconvertible, making comparison with experimental papers easier.
    More example sentences
    • The section on the interconversion of molal and molar solutions needs to be reworded.
    • An example of this would be describing a solution as a 1 molar solution, or saying it had a strength of 1 M.
    • In this case a solution that was 0.9 molar in trehalose and sucrose was examined for a sample at known spacing as described for water.

Definition of molar in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.