Translation of nutty in Spanish:

nutty

Pronunciation: /ˈnʌti/

adjective/adjetivo (-tier, -tiest)

  • 1 [taste] a nueces ( or almendras etc)
    More example sentences
    • Simply grind in a coffee grinder or high-powered blender 3 measures of linseed, two measures of sunflower seeds and one measure of almonds to make a delicious nutty tasting powder.
    • For appetizers, I recommend the arugala salad for those who enjoy the distinctly nutty flavour of this salad green.
    • We sampled the plump, satisfying pork pot-stickers as well as the shrimp balls on cloud ear mushrooms, which combined a distinctly nutty flavour with the sweet pink puffs of shrimp.
  • 2 [colloquial/familiar] 2.1 (eccentric) [professor] chiflado [colloquial/familiar], chalado [colloquial/familiar]; [idea] de loco 2.2 (very fond) to be nutty about sb estar* loco or chalado or chiflado por algn [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • There is no tangible search for solutions and little real, positive innovation or creativity; merely the recycling of outdated ideas, baseless gossip and nutty proposals.
    • Out there on the radical fringe, Lester knows he's unlikely to persuade the U.S. Congress to adopt his nutty proposals
    • I have no doubt that the advice you have received from economists and tax experts has told you why your proposal is nutty.

Definition of nutty in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.