Translation of obligation in Spanish:

obligation

Pronunciation: /ˌɑːbləˈgeɪʃən; ˌɒblɪˈgeɪʃən/

n

  • 1.1 c u (duty, requirement) obligación (f) moral/legal obligation obligación moral/legal family/professional obligations prevented me from attending compromisos (mpl) familiares/profesionales me impidieron asistir I feel/have an obligation to my parents me siento obligado/tengo una obligación para con mis padres obligation to + inf obligación de + inf we have an obligation to help them tenemos la obligación de ayudarlos there's no obligation to buy no hay obligación de comprar to be under an obligation (to + inf) it has placed me under an obligation to help her me ha puesto en el compromiso de tener que ayudarla I understand that I am under no obligation and may return it at any time entiendo que no contraigo ninguna obligación y puedo devolverlo en cualquier momento
    More example sentences
    • He then requires man to work hard, fulfill his duties and meet his obligations.
    • The activities of political participation and public deliberation, on this view, should not be seen as a burdensome obligation or duty, but rather as intrinsically rewarding.
    • But Miss Mountfield told the judges that the Returning Officer's duty extended beyond an obligation to ‘deliver to the deliverer’.
    1.2 c (financial commitment) [Busn] compromiso (m) the firm was unable to meet its obligations la compañía no pudo hacer frente a sus compromisos
    More example sentences
    • In the absence of any promise, agreement or obligation to make the payment when he acquired, took possession of or used the money, he had given no consideration within the meaning of the Act.
    • Thus, if the proper law of the payment obligation is country Y, its moratorium will be given effect.
    • The adjudicator's decision, although not finally determinative, may give rise to an immediate payment obligation.

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Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.