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octave

Pronunciation: /ˈɑːktɪv; ˈɒktɪv/

Translation of octave in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • [Literat] [Music/Música] octava (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • These ratios produce the eight notes of an octave in the musical scale corresponding to the white keys on a piano.
    • Trotter uses this music to introduce octaves, accented rhythms, a whole tone scale and a continuous cross-hand pattern.
    • One of the most difficult passages for the violin in the first movement is a melodic minor one-octave scale in fingered octaves.
    Example sentences
    • What is it that makes notes one octave apart fit together so well?
    • I hissed softly, my voice a few octaves higher than it should have been.
    • His voice had changed, dropping several octaves.
    Example sentences
    • Meanwhile, strong octave Bs in the bass, along with the lengthy pedals necessary to sustain them, create the tremendous resonance this passage requires.
    • In another, open octaves alternate with chordal homophony.
    • Psychotic disco drums and vivacious octave bass lines introduce us to the Liars new mania.
    Example sentences
    • Lerner conquered the score's thunderous octaves and tone clusters brilliantly.
    • They chant in a deep harmonic, which can be heard sounding three octaves at once during stages in the ritual.
    • The main difficulty of the second section is the pages of interlocking octaves, chords and single notes covering the entire range of the keyboard.
    Example sentences
    • The second quatrain of Smith's sonnet alludes to Petrarch's octave.
    • Not only has the poet repeatedly discovered different dramatic structures, she also discovered whole new octaves of tone.
    • The beginning octave of this sonnet fits poorly with the sestet.

Definition of octave in:

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Word of the day vedar
vt
to prohibit …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a school that is privately owned but receives a government grant is called a colegio concertado. Parents pay monthly fees, but not as much as in a colegio privado. Colegios concertados normally cover all stages of primary and secondary education and often have religious connections.