Share this entry

Share this page

persist

Pronunciation: /pərˈsɪst; pəˈsɪst/

Translation of persist in Spanish:

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1.1 [person] (continue doggedly)to persist in sth/-ing they persisted in the belief o in believing that … persistieron en la creencia de que … the reporter persisted in asking awkward questions el reportero insistió en hacer preguntas embarazosas he will persist in calling me 'darling' insiste or se empeña en llamarme 'cariño'
    Example sentences
    • He retreated to the ground and did not continue to persist in creating hostile assaults.
    • The main effort should focus on finding a solution to the conflict, rather than persisting with the current situation of conflict management.
    • But the BCC and the police are firm about persisting with the system.
    1.2 [belief/rumor/doubts] persistir if the pain persists, see your doctor si persiste el dolor, consulte a su médico if the rain persists … si continúa or sigue lloviendo …
    Example sentences
    • After the operation his symptoms persisted and got worse, leaving him in such pain that he had to be prescribed morphine.
    • O'Connor said the symptoms usually persist for a few days and then ease up.
    • It says on the packet to consult your doctor if symptoms persist for more than seven days.

Definition of persist in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day llanero
m,f
plainsman …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.