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philosophy

Pronunciation: /fəˈlɑːsəfi; fɪˈlɒsəfi/

Translation of philosophy in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (subject) filosofía (feminine) the philosophy of science la filosofía de la ciencia
    Example sentences
    • Theology ‘is an academic discipline like philosophy, English literature or the classics,’ he said.
    • One of the fundamental tasks of philosophy has always been to determine what belongs to nature.
    • Those who question the existence of African philosophy argue that philosophy is rooted in epistemology and metaphysics.
    1.2 countable/numerable (particular school, belief) filosofía (feminine) live and let live: that's my philosophy mi filosofía es vive y deja vivir
    Example sentences
    • At Jena, Hegel published a long pamphlet on the differences between the philosophies of Fichte and Schelling: in every case, in his opinion, Schelling's view was to be preferred.
    • Compatibilist philosophies seek to reconcile free will and determinism in a modern time.
    • This is because traditional notions of determinism in positivist and empiricist philosophies of science produced the odd idea that causation in the human world is agent-less and is not a force.
    Example sentences
    • Urban schools provide a different context for the development of knowledge, attitudes, and philosophies that guide the behaviors of beginning teachers.
    • The philosophy of ‘live by the camera, die by the camera ‘must also be on the minds of some editors.’
    • The philosophy of auctions took off in the '90s, and one can grant de facto property rights without de jure property rights.

Definition of philosophy in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.