There are 2 translations of placard in Spanish:

placard1

Pronunciation: /ˈplækɑːrd; ˈplækɑːd/

n

  • letrero (m), cartel (m); (at demonstration) pancarta (f)
    More example sentences
    • The article says that his followers already have the placards for the demonstrations printed up and stored for use.
    • Students painted their bodies with slogans or carried hand-written placards condemning the drive to war.
    • Each person was forced to sign an agreement not to carry placards or banners, shout slogans, or wear clothes with written words of complaint.

Definition of placard in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of placard in Spanish:

placard2

vt

  • 1.1 (cover) [walls/hoarding] cubrir* de carteles
    More example sentences
    • But no one in authority seems to care, and one of these days, you may find on our lunch hour, teachers are placarding the Tarouba Road out of frustration.
    • Quite apart from his agents, who are everywhere, the country is placarded with his portraits in a variety of roles.
    • Under constraint of time and the non-availability of the appropriate placards, the contractor decided to transport the explosives without properly placarding their vehicle, a direct violation of safety standards.
    1.2 (advertise) anunciar (con carteles)

Definition of placard in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.