Translation of player in Spanish:

player

Pronunciation: /ˈpleɪər; ˈpleɪə(r)/

noun/nombre

  • 1 [Games/Juegos] [Sport/Deporte] jugador, (masculine, feminine) he's a keen tennis player le gusta mucho jugar tenis or (Spain/España) (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) al tenis
    More example sentences
    • Baseball is a sport and players need to decide whether they play the game for the love of the game or for economics.
    • The class is designed to accommodate all athletes and sports players at suitable indoor training.
    • Skiba says that many football players now sport a garment called compression shorts.
  • 2 2.1 [Music/Música] músico (masculine and feminine), músico, (masculine, feminine), instrumentista (masculine and feminine) she's a really good guitar-player es muy buena guitarrista 2.2 (actor) [arch or formal] actor, (masculine, feminine) traveling players cómicos (masculine plural) de la legua
    More example sentences
    • There are two basic types of male film actor - leading men and character players.
    • Let's call them chefs or actors, or players or whatever and leave them off the pedestal.
    • The acting in this film is fine across the board, from lead actors to bit players.
    More example sentences
    • In addition, a cassette or compact disc player may be placed within reach for listening to music or audio books.
    • But you do get a lot of extra brightly coloured cassette tape players that eat batteries and break really easily.
    • Songs can then be copied to iPod players or burned onto compact disc.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.