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pocketbook

Pronunciation: /ˈpɑːkətbʊk; ˈpɒkɪtbʊk/

Translation of pocketbook in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (handbag) (American English/inglés norteamericano) cartera (feminine) or (Spain/España) bolso (masculine) or (Mexico/México) bolsa (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • I took my change purse out of my pocketbook and scowled.
    • They were similar pocketbooks or purses, but they had a belt on it that you could put around your waist with the fasteners similar to the ones on a bicycle helmet.
    • His hands were rifling through her pocketbook and wallet.
    1.2 (wallet) (American English/inglés norteamericano) cartera (feminine), billetera (feminine) to vote one's pocketbook votar con el bolsillo 1.3 (paperback) (American English/inglés norteamericano) libro (masculine) en rústica
    Example sentences
    • I put my books and pocket book into my small gym locker and kept my light spring jacket to watch the practice.
    • No one bothered to refer to the significantly expanded, easily accessible pocket book edition.
    • She disappeared into the hallway to the bedroom for a few seconds and when she returned she was holding a small black pocket book in one hand and the black baseball cap from the day before in the other.
    1.4 (notebook) (British English/inglés británico) cuaderno (masculine), libreta (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • What he had not anticipated when he chose the slightly inebriated, seriously overweight woman attempting to hail a cab, was how attached she would be to her pocketbook.
    • It is a pocketbook which fits the hand perfectly.
    • She had come for a pocketbook and a pocketbook only.

Definition of pocketbook in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.