Translation of polarize in Spanish:

polarize

Pronunciation: /ˈpəʊləraɪz/

vt

  • 1.1 [Chem] [Elec] [Phys] polarizar*
    More example sentences
    • We used the EOM and quarter-wave plate combination to rotate the polarization direction of the linearly polarized laser light.
    • Bile must be centrifuged and examined under polarizing or light microscopy for detection of precipitates.
    • Even though the sun itself produces fully depolarized light, partially linearly polarized light is abundant in natural scenes.
    More example sentences
    • By polarizing the cells, ions are removed from the electrolyte and are held in the electric double layers formed at the carbon aerogel surfaces of the electrodes.
    • Whenever a gas gets sufficiently cold, ions attract a crowd by polarizing surrounding atoms - inducing a charge asymmetry in them - which draws them near.
    • The S atom in this side chain also helps polarize the C-H bond more than other methyl C-H bonds.
    1.2 (divide) [nation/opinion] polarizar*

vi

  • 1.1 [Chem] [Elec] [Phys] polarizarse* 1.2 (divide) polarizarse*
    More example sentences
    • Analysts brushed aside on Friday fears that political parties would be polarized into Islamic and nationalist groupings in their struggle for power in the 2004 election.
    • Political life became sharply polarised between the left, dominated ideologically if not numerically by the Stalinists, and the right, dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood.
    • You will find opinions as polarised here as anywhere in the world, if not more so.

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