Translation of profligate in Spanish:

profligate

Pronunciation: /ˈprɑːflɪgət; ˈprɒflɪgət/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 (extravagant) derrochador, despilfarrador a profligate misuse of the country's resources un despilfarro de los recursos del país
    More example sentences
    • Unfortunately, the extent of the downswing will be proportional to boom-time excesses, and the profligate consumer sector will be forced to retrench.
    • Dismissing conservation as a low priority is dangerous in that it will encourage a profligate use of natural resources and a lack of concern about the current human destruction of the Earth.
    • Manifestly, America's bubble economy of the late 1990s had its center in the most profligate consumer borrowing and spending binge in history.
    1.2 (immoral) [formal] disoluto, libertino
    More example sentences
    • The recent support for the party of Pim Fortuyn in the Netherlands has failed to quell the spirit of profligate immorality endemic to that country.
    • In Northern Europe, they'll deny you a discharge if they think you ran up the original debt in a profligate or immoral fashion.

noun/nombre

[formal]
  • 1.1 (immoral person) libertino, (masculine, feminine) 1.2 (spendthrift) derrochador, (masculine, feminine), despilfarrador, (masculine, feminine)

Definition of profligate in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.