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quickie
American English: /ˈkwɪki/
British English: /ˈkwɪki/

Translation of quickie in Spanish:

noun

  • [colloquial]
    uno rápido
    una rápida
    just a quickie
    (question)
    solo una preguntita
    let's have a quickie
    (drink)
    tomémonos una copita
    (sex)
    echémonos un polvito [slang]
    (before noun) (divorce)
    Example sentences
    • Let the last word rest with the Italian ambassador, Luigi Amaduzzi: ‘I asked the barmaid for a quickie.’
    • However during the first half I had to nip to the loo twice and on each journey I slugged another quickie of Rioja down.
    • Just a quickie tonight - I think it's only right and respectful on Australia Day to crack open a can of Fosters and celebrate with our friends on the other side of the world!
    Example sentences
    • Taking time means that while quickies are fun, really satisfying sex lasts a lot longer than 15 minutes.
    • Mary is undeterred; if she can't have sex with him, then she'll just have a quickie, damn it: she goes for his pants and he squeals like a girl - or like I do when Anne asks me if I know how horses eat grass.
    • Another magazine article revealed that when women want to have a fling they will pick a tall, dark and handsome type, thinking that guy doesn't want commitment because of this apparent statistic and therefore worth a quickie.

Definition of quickie in:

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    Cultural fact of the day

    comarca

    In Spain, a geographical, social, and culturally homogeneous region, with a clear natural or administrative demarcation is called a comarca. Comarcas are normally smaller than regiones. They are often famous for some reason, for example Ampurdán (Catalonia) for its wines, or La Mancha (Castile) for its cheeses.