Translation of relationship in Spanish:

relationship

Pronunciation: /rɪˈleɪʃənʃɪp/

noun/nombre

  • 1 countable/numerable (between people) relación (feminine) to have a good relationship with sb llevarse bien con algn we have a good working relationship trabajamos bien juntos, tenemos or mantenemos una buena relación de trabajo
    More example sentences
    • In other words privity of estate arises when there is a relationship of landlord and tenant between the parties.
    • It represents a process that is actively destructive of people's views of themselves, and their relationships with each other.
    • It recognises the role of family and other relationships in influencing trends towards recovery or relapse.
  • 2 c and u (between things, events) relación (feminine) a causal relationship una relación causa-efecto
    More example sentences
    • The standard contract so far only specifies the business relationship between contractors and agencies.
    • So there are some awkward questions here about the relationship between units and interaction capacity.
    • Each of these two definitions seems to imply a relationship between slightly different concepts.
  • 3 uncountable/no numerable (kinship) relationship (to sb) parentesco (masculine)(con algn) she claimed relationship with the Queen decía estar emparentada con la reina
    More example sentences
    • Your present relationship or marriage is strengthened through love and understanding.
    • I think that's a common way of looking at relationships because marriage is a form of contractual ownership.
    • Even heterosexuals are showing greater skepticism about relationships and marriage.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.