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repudiate

Pronunciation: /rɪˈpjuːdieɪt/

Translation of repudiate in Spanish:

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (reject, deny) [charge/accusation] rechazar*, negar*
    Example sentences
    • Carteret's wife Olivia, for her part, is determined to repudiate the legal and moral claims of her mulatto half-sister - Janet Miller - on their father's estate.
    1.2 (refuse to acknowledge, disown) [liability/debt] negarse* a reconocer; [violence/teaching] repudiar; [wife/family] repudiar
    Example sentences
    • Rejecting a constricting southern ethos, Florence flees to Harlem and marries Frank, a hard-drinking blues singer; subsequently, she repudiates him for rejecting her middle-class American values.
    • He continued to argue against the King's divorce and the split with Rome, and in 1534 was arrested after refusing to swear an Oath of Succession repudiating the Pope and accepting the annulment of the marriage to Catherine.
    • It's believed that the insurance companies sought to repudiate their policies partly on the basis that the Department had failed to disclose details of penalties imposed prior to 1992.
    Example sentences
    • This leads to the possibility of the US repudiating its existing debt obligations to external creditors.
    • I would advocate going on to repudiate the entire debt outright, and let the chips fall where they may.
    • When things went poorly for the Spanish, they just repudiated their debts and started over.
    Example sentences
    • Only the husband may repudiate his spouse, although the wife may provoke him to make that decision.
    • As caput mansi or head of the household, the husband of the mother of the twin boys, should he choose to repudiate his wife, would be following a convention deemed appropriate to protect the social order with respect to unfaithful wives.
    • The building reminded them of a past that belonged to them and their ancestors, a past they did not wish to repudiate.

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