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salute

Pronunciation: /səˈluːt/

Translation of salute in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 countable/numerable (gesture) saludo (masculine), venia (feminine) (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) to take the salute (on dais) presidir el desfile 1.2 countable/numerable (firing of guns) salva (feminine) a 21-gun salute una salva de 21 cañonazos
    Example sentences
    • Excitement still pervaded the air, which hummed with voices and the crackle and pop of logs in the fire like a twenty-one gun salute.
    • She received a 21-gun salute during the welcoming ceremony at Merdeka Palace.
    • Hu, who released a short statement outlining the goals of his visit, was given a 21-gun salute as part of an official welcoming ceremony, she said.
    1.3 (tribute) (no plural/sin plural) homenaje (masculine), reconocimiento (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • I lifted my glass in salute to all my American friends, enjoying the big Thanksgiving meal, and thought with only a tinge of envy of the delights of roast turkey with all the trimmings.
    • In a final mark of respect, a rescue helicopter circled low over the bay, dropped a wreath into the sea, and dipped its nose in salute to those on the headland.
    • When the jet reached Manchester Airport, the aircraft's wings were tipped in salute to its new home before circling and touching down.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 [Military/Militar] [officer] saludar to salute the flag saludar la bandera 1.2 (acknowledge, pay tribute) [formal] [courage/achievement] rendir* homenaje a I can only salute your singlemindedness no puedo sino aplaudir su determinación 1.3 (greet) [formal] [friend/person/event] saludar

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • [Military/Militar] to salute (to sb) hacerle* el saludo or (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) la venia (a algn)

Definition of salute in:

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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a school that is privately owned but receives a government grant is called a colegio concertado. Parents pay monthly fees, but not as much as in a colegio privado. Colegios concertados normally cover all stages of primary and secondary education and often have religious connections.