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schooner

Pronunciation: /ˈskuːnər; ˈskuːnə(r)/

Translation of schooner in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1 [Nautical/Náutica] goleta (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • The glimmering vessel was a great schooner, with multiple masts on top and impressive quarters inside.
    • The visit of the barques, brigantines and schooners also seemed to drive off some of the tourism malaise created by a July shrouded in fog, damp and rain.
    • A lone sailboat, a single schooner, a solitary steamship might not have much impact in an eclectic gallery.
  • 2 2.1 (glass for beer) (American English/inglés norteamericano) jarra (feminine) or bock (masculine) or (Mexico/México) tarro (masculine) de cerveza 2.2 (glass for sherry) (British English/inglés británico) copa (feminine) de jerez
    Example sentences
    • They'd rather drink a schooner of fortified wine than be seen with a glass of something pink.
    • The branders and marketeers would like to bypass the image of refined sherry drinkers taking their apéritif from miniature schooners with the little finger slightly adrift of the glass.
    Example sentences
    • Painted on it was a red demon holding a schooner of beer.
    • Most have done more physical damage to themselves in endless schooners.
    • He received a fitting farewell in front of his home crowd before enjoying a celebratory schooner in the family pub in Sydney's inner-west.

Definition of schooner in:

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into Italian
Word of the day llanero
m,f
plainsman …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.