There are 3 main translations of shock in Spanish:

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shock 1

American English: /ʃɑk/
British English: /ʃɒk/

noun

  • 2 2.1 uncountable (Medicine) to be in (a state of) shock
    estar en estado de shock
    they were taken to hospital suffering from shock
    los llevaron al hospital en estado de shock
    2.2 uncountable and countable (distress, surprise) to get a shock
    llevarse un shock or una impresión
    I nearly died of shock
    por poco me muero del shock or de la impresión
    the shock of her death
    el shock or el golpe de su muerte
    the news came as no great shock to us
    la noticia no nos sorprendió demasiado
    he's in for a shock when he finds out
    se va a llevar un shock cuando se entere
    shock, horror! (British English) [humorous]
    ¡horror de horrores!
    (before noun) a shock announcement
    un anuncio sorprendente
    un bombazo [colloquial]
    Example sentences
    • Devlin caught it instantly, wearing a look of utter shock on his face.
    • Sputtering, he broke the surface, a look of utter shock on his face.
    • Today was… pay day… and I got the biggest shock of my life.
    2.3 (scare) to get a shock
    llevarse un susto
    what a shock you gave me!
    ¡qué susto me diste or me pegaste!
    Example sentences
    • It's a bit of a shock to experience the reality of the cruise liner rather than the fantasy - especially when the reality is just as fantastic in its own way.
    • And so nobody else has to go through this experience and the shock initially when that happens.
    • However, due to the shock of the experience and the upset caused to the young boy, the pair cut their holiday short and returned home.
    Example sentences
    • Hypovolaemic shock follows major blood loss which may be caused by trauma or during surgery.
    • Contraindications to the vaccines can be as severe as allergic shock, collapse, seizures, permanent brain injury or death.
    • This type of treatment must only be carried out under close supervision from a doctor because of the risk that it may cause a serious allergic reaction called anaphylactic shock.
  • 3 (Cars) [colloquial] shock absorber
    Example sentences
    • We just didn't have enough in the budget to fix the Charger if an axle broke or the shocks went out.
    • A country with bad roads does not require ceramic engines; it needs vehicles with rugged axles and shocks.
    • Improved suspension parts ranging from bushings to springs, shocks and tires make this vehicle a stand out in terms of handling and ride quality.

transitive verb

  • 1.1 (stun, appal)
    (scare)
    he was shocked by what he saw
    quedó horrorizado or impactado or (Chile) choqueado con lo que vio
    the country was shocked by the news of his death
    la noticia de su muerte sacudió or conmocionó al país
    my mother is easily shocked
    mi madre se escandaliza or se horroriza por cualquier cosa
    it shocked me into being more careful
    me asustó realmente y ahora tengo más cuidado
    1.2 (Medicine)to be shocked
    sufrir un shock
    Example sentences
    • Implanted in the chest, the ICD is a small electronic device which shocks the heart back into a healthy rhythm if it detects an abnormal heartbeat.
    • The electric current shocks the sweat glands, and they stop producing sweat temporarily.
    • Patients who remain shocked after 3 litres of intravenous fluid usually have continued bleeding and require urgent laparotomy.
    Example sentences
    • She was visibly upset, and it shocked me, watching her.
    • But this week, when he visited, he was shocked and deeply upset to find his beloved wife's grave had been used as a dumping ground for the earth which had been removed from a next door grave.
    • We had a meeting to discuss the figures and people were shocked and surprised.
    Example sentences
    • He projected an unpretentious, open image, and his reputation for moral rectitude became a crucial asset for a nation still shocked by the Watergate scandal.
    • While others were quite shocked or even offended by the waitress's behaviour, I was very amused.
    • I believe that future generations will be shocked and outraged that it took us so long.

intransitive verb

Definition of shock in:

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There are 3 main translations of shock in Spanish:

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shock 2
American English: /ʃɑk/
British English: /ʃɒk/

noun

  • (Agriculture)
    Example sentences
    • This accumulation of the bundles in the field was a big help for the manual labor which is what it took to assemble grain shocks from all those bundles!
    • The grain shocks would be off-loaded into the thrashing machines.
    • The field of wheat is well in the foreground, diversified and defined by the shocks of grain to the right.

Definition of shock in:

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There are 3 main translations of shock in Spanish:

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shock 3
American English: /ʃɑk/
British English: /ʃɒk/

noun

  • (bushy mass) See examples: a shock of hair
    una mata de pelo
    Example sentences
    • He is handsome, with high cheekbones, a strong chin, and a shock of thick hair, and he stares with a slight frown at something in the distance.
    • He had a thick shock of dark brown hair, with a little gray peeking in around his temples and just above his ears.
    • He has a shock of thick snow-blond hair that is certain to attract the others in white.

Definition of shock in:

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