Translation of signature in Spanish:

signature

Pronunciation: /ˈsɪgnətʃər; ˈsɪgnətʃə(r)/

n

  • 1 (written name) firma (feminine), rúbrica (feminine) [formal] to put one's signature to a letter/petition firmar una carta/una petición
    More example sentences
    • The analysis concluded that the signature on the document was ‘very similar’ to Chen's.
    • A petition is nothing more than a list of names, addresses and signatures with your cause written at the top of each page.
    • The group began with the signed letter of September 5 with more than 800 signatures and verified the names and identification.
  • 3 (on prescription) (American English/inglés norteamericano) indicaciones (feminine plural) para el paciente
    More example sentences
    • If famotidine is used for reasons other than the two criteria described below, the attending physician will also need to provide a signature and an explanation for the use of famotidine.
  • 4 [Printing/Imprenta] 4.1 (binding guide) signatura (feminine) 4.2 (section) pliego (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • To make the inside signatures fold copy paper in half the long way.
    • This format once was regarded as forgivable, back when illustrations were printed in separate signatures on better paper, which these are not.
    • I spilled a whole pot of glue on a stack of signatures, spoiling the pages.
    More example sentences
    • The signature ensured that a large sheet of paper printed on a press could be folded, gathered, bound, and cut with the leaves in the proper order.

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Word of the day esporádicamente
adv
sporadically …
Cultural fact of the day

The PAN (Partido de Acción Nacional) is the political party that won the Mexican general elections in 2000, breaking the Partido Revolucional Institucional's record of 71 years in power. PRI - Partido Revolucionario InstitucionalPAN was founded in 1939 as a conservative alternative to President, Lázaro Cárdenas. It presents an image of being a defender of popular causes, but takes an individualistic approach to matters of education and property. Its traditional policies include limiting state intervention in the economy to a minimum and bringing about a greater rapprochement between the government and the church.