There are 2 translations of skid in Spanish:

skid1

Pronunciation: /skɪd/

n

  • 2 (for moving goods) rastra (f) to be on the skids [colloquial/familiar] ir* cuesta abajo to hit the skids empezar* a ir cuesta abajo to put the skids under sb hacerle* or (Esp) ponerle* la zancadilla a algn, (a)serrucharle el piso a algn (CS) that put the skids under our proposals eso dio al traste con nuestras propuestas

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of skid in Spanish:

skid2

vi (-dd-)

  • [car/plane/wheels] patinar, derrapar; [person] resbalarse; [object] deslizarse* the car skidded on the ice el coche patinó or derrapó en el hielo we skidded off the road/into a tree patinamos or derrapamos y nos salimos de la carretera/y chocamos contra un árbol the vehicle skidded to a halt el vehículo se detuvo tras dar un patinazo I skidded across the kitchen floor (me) resbalé y me fui de un lado al otro de la cocina

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.