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slacker

Pronunciation: /ˈslækər; ˈslækə(r)/

Translation of slacker in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • [colloquial/familiar] vago, (masculine, feminine) [colloquial/familiar], flojo, (masculine, feminine) [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • Antoine is a layabout slacker who lives in a lounge at a health club where a friend lets him stay.
    • For the most part they're the seekers, slackers, and free spirits who tend to avoid the straight life, such as it is, for as long as they can.
    • In short, they are slackers - but, to their credit, slackers with jobs.
    Example sentences
    • Yes, we had slackers, draft dodgers and antiwar advocates, but they got short shrift, little attention and almost no press.
    Example sentences
    • Despite their slacker stereotype, many members of Generation X have grown up to be useful and productive members of society.
    • No one can represent an entire generation - including hippies, slackers, and dotcom CEOs.
    • They were a large part of slacker culture, and became poster boys for Generation X.

Definition of slacker in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.