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slaughter

Pronunciation: /ˈslɔːtər; ˈslɔːtə(r)/

Translation of slaughter in Spanish:

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (of animals) matanza (feminine) ritual slaughter sacrificio (masculine) (ritual)
    Example sentences
    • The course covers meat processing from slaughter to packaging, food preparation and export compliance, health and safety, and communication skills.
    • Both pathogens can colonise the intestines of beef cattle and get into the food chain during slaughter at the abattoir.
    • The Bible records many examples of the slaughter of animals for food, products or purpose.
    1.2 (massacre) masacre (feminine), matanza (feminine), carnicería (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • Yet Amin took the use of murder as a way of dealing with all enemies, real or imagined, to new heights in Uganda and conducted his campaign of slaughter with cruel relish.
    • Those possibilities, it seems, now extend to violent slaughter of the type previously monopolised by male action heroes.
    • Brutal conquests to be sure, his bloody wake of slaughter in the violent thirteenth century led to the murder of untold millions.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (kill) [pig/cattle] matar, carnear (Southern Cone/Cono Sur) ; [civilians/troops] matar salvajemente, masacrar 1.2 (defeat) [colloquial/familiar] [opponent/team] darle* una paliza a [colloquial/familiar] we were slaughtered in the final nos dieron una paliza en la final [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of slaughter in:

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