There are 2 translations of smart in Spanish:

smart1

Pronunciation: /smɑːrt; smɑːt/

adj (-er, -est)

  • 1 1.1 (neat, stylish) [appearance/dress/shoes] elegante you're looking very smart today hoy estás muy elegante they have a really smart house tienen una casa muy bien puesta his room looks very smart su habitación está muy bien (arreglada) 1.2 (chic) [hotel/neighborhood] elegante, fino the smart set la gente bien, la gente de buen tono

More definitions of smart

Definition of smart in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of smart in Spanish:

smart2

vi

  • 1.1 (sting) [eyes] escocer*, picar*, arder; [wound] escocer*, arder (CS) the memory of her words still smarted sus palabras le seguían doliendo or lo seguían mortificando 1.2 (be distressed) to smart from sth resentirse* de algo they're still smarting from their defeat in the elections todavía se resienten de su derrota electoralto smart under sth she smarted under his cruel irony su ironía hiriente la hacía sufrir

Phrasal verbs

smart off

v + adv (AmE)
[colloquial/familiar] ser* insolente don't smart off to your mother! ¡no seas insolente or no te insolentes con tu madre!

More definitions of smart

Definition of smart in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.