Share this entry

Share this page

speak

(past tense of/pasado de spoke or [archaic], spake past participle of/participio pasado de, spoken)
Pronunciation: /spiːk/

Translation of speak in Spanish:

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1 1.1 (say sth) hablar sorry, did you speak? perdón ¿dijiste algo? or ¿me hablaste? to speak to o (especially American English/especialmente inglés norteamericano) with sb hablar con algn, hablarle a algn could I speak to o with you for a moment? ¿puedo hablar contigo un momento?, ¿puedo hablarte un momento? wake up Mark, speak to me! ¡Mark despierta, di algo! he doesn't speak to me no me habla, no me dirige la palabra they are not speaking (to each other) no se hablan, no se dirigen la palabra I don't know her to speak to solo la conozco de vista I'll have to speak to her about her behavior tendré que hablar con ella acerca de su comportamiento, tendré que llamarle la atención sobre su comportamiento I've often heard her speak about it a menudo la he oído hablar de eso to speak of sth/sb/-ing hablar de algo/algn/+ infinitive/infinitivo people still speak of him with enormous respect aún hoy la gente habla de él con mucho respeto you spoke once of making way for someone younger una vez mencionaste la idea or hablaste de dejarle el camino libre a alguien más joven you never spoke of this to anyone? ¿nunca hablaste de esto con nadie?, ¿nunca le mencionaste esto a nadie? his face spoke of terrible suffering su rostro tenía la huella de enormes sufrimientos the meeting is on Friday, speaking of which … la reunión es el viernes, y a propósito … they don't have much money to speak of no tienen mucho dinero, que digamos to speak well/ill of sb hablar bien/mal de algn speaking personally, I think … personalmente, creo que … speaking as a parent/teacher, I think … como padre/maestro, creo que …, en mi calidad de padre/maestro, creo que … roughly/generally speaking en términos generales he's not, strictly speaking, a member no es, en realidad, socio, no es un socio en el sentido estricto de la palabra legally/morally speaking desde el punto de vista legal/moral so to speak por así decirlo
    Example sentences
    • I stood silent, unable to speak as the information slipped into my mind.
    • During their gigs, the six-some regularly distributes pamphlets of information and speaks on stage about causes they feel strongly about.
    • Israel was quiet, as if digesting that bit of information and then he spoke, harshly and firmly.
    1.2 (on telephone) hello, accounts department, Jones speaking buenos días, contaduría, Jones al habla hello, Barbara Mason speaking, could you … buenas tardes, habla or (in Spain also/en España también) soy Barbara Mason ¿podría … ? could I speak to Mrs Hodges, please? — speaking! ¿podría hablar con la Sra. Hodges, por favor? — con ella (habla) who's speaking, please? (to caller) ¿de parte de quien? (to person answering a call) ¿con quién hablo?
  • 2 (make speech) hablar then the chairman spoke luego habló el presidente, luego hizo uso de la palabra el presidente [formal] he spoke for two hours habló durante dos horas the delegate rose to speak el delegado se levantó para hacer uso de la palabra [formal] I'm a bit worried about speaking in public la idea de hablar en público me pone un poco nerviosa to speak on oabout sth hablar acerca de or sobre algo she spoke for o in favor of/against capital punishment habló a favor/en contra de la pena de muerte
    Example sentences
    • During his long speech, he finally speaks about the silence in which he has brought up his beloved son.
    • I also heard him speak at a lecture, which I found inspirational.
    • And in hearing her speak, I think she comes off very differently.
  • 3 (address) to speak to sb/sth dirigirse* a algn/algo lines that speak to the heart líneas que apelan a los sentimientos

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • 1.1 (say, declare) nobody spoke a word nadie dijo nada, nadie abrió la boca [colloquial/familiar] to speak one's lines decir* or recitar su ( or mi etc) parlamento to speak one's mind o thoughts hablar claro or con franqueza to speak the truth decir* la verdad 1.2 [language] hablar do you speak English? ¿habla inglés? English spoken se habla inglés
    Example sentences
    • They were also very intelligent and able to speak every language naturally.
    • Prospect New Town, for its part, speaks the language of community and celebrates authenticity.
    • Do you know which ones are able to speak the language you know?

Phrasal verbs

speak for

verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento hablar por I think I speak for all of us when I say that … creo que hablo por todos or en nombre de todos al decir que … we'd love to meet him — speak for yourself! nos encantaría conocerlo — ¡eso lo dirás por ti! or ¡a mí no me incluyas! I can't speak for the others, but I … no sé los demás, pero yo … the facts speak for themselves los hechos son elocuentes 1.1to be spoken for (engaged) [dated or hum] estar* comprometido (reserved) estar* reservado

speak out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
I decided it was time to speak out resolví que había llegado el momento de expresar mi opinión ( or declarar mi postura etc)to speak out for/against sth he spoke out against corruption denunció la corrupción existente she spoke out for the strikers defendió a los huelguistas

speak up

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
1.1 (speak loudly, clearly) hablar más fuerte or más alto 1.2 (speak boldly) decir* lo que se piensa to speak up for sb defender* a algn to speak up for sth hablar a favor de algo

Definition of speak in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day llanero
m,f
plainsman …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.