There are 2 translations of squeak in Spanish:

squeak1

Pronunciation: /skwiːk/

n

  • 1 (of animal, person) chillido (m); (of hinge, pen) chirrido (m); (of shoes) crujido (m) to give o let out a squeak pegar* un chillido any messages from New York? — not a squeak ¿algún mensaje de Nueva York? — ni una palabra or [colloquial/familiar] ni pío I don't want to hear a squeak out of anyone [colloquial, humorous/familiar, humorístico] no quiero que se oiga ni el vuelo de una mosca
    More example sentences
    • ‘I wasn't aware dinner had been served,’ I replied my voice sounding like a squeak when it came out.
    • Grover Norquist, on the other hand, speaks like a man who had all the delight squeezed out of him years ago, leaving him with nothing in his voice but a high-pitched squeak of disdain.
    • It made short purring sounds, mixed with squeaks, then it vanished.
  • 2 (escape) [colloquial/familiar] a narrow o (in American English also/en inglés norteamericano también) close squeak we got there in time, but it was a narrow squeak llegamos a tiempo, pero por un pelo or por los pelos [colloquial/familiar] she's never actually had an accident, but she's had several narrow squeaks nunca ha llegado a tener un accidente pero se ha salvado por un pelo or por los pelos varias veces [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Still, even while driving in and out of Irish potholes, you'll hear no squeak or feel no squirm from the structure or fittings.
    • And have we heard a squeak from the director with the verbal incontinence?
    • Now, we have been blessed with a good summer and very few people are saying squeak.

Definition of squeak in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of squeak in Spanish:

squeak2

vi

  • 1.1 [animal/person] chillar; [hinge/pen] chirriar*; [shoes] crujir
    More example sentences
    • At the sound of the door squeaking slowly open, both of us rose and turned to face it.
    • Just then, the sound of keys and the front door squeaking open met our ears.
    • The floors had stopped squeaking, and there was the sound of someone walking on the boards that didn't squeak.
    1.2 (pass by a narrow margin) to squeak past/through pasar raspando [colloquial/familiar]

Phrasal verbs

squeak in

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
salir* elegido por un margen muy estrecho or [colloquial/familiar] por un pelo

squeak out

verb + adverb + object/verbo + adverbio + complemento (American English/inglés norteamericano)
[win/victory] conseguir* por un pelo [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of squeak in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.