Translation of sweeping in Spanish:

sweeping

Pronunciation: /ˈswiːpɪŋ/

adj

  • 1.1 [movement] amplio; [gesture] dramático, histriónico
    More example sentences
    • This was previously Ben Stevenson's place, she says, her buff arms extending in a sweeping motion to encompass the townhouse living room.
    • A rich brew of extended lines, sweeping curves, off-kilter balances, de Schynkel's vocabulary is expressive without being literal.
    • High above Kresna, we were following a trail through the foothills of Pirin, and were being treated to a sweeping panorama that seemingly extended all the way to Greece.
    1.2 (indiscriminate) [pejorative/peyorativo] that's rather a sweeping statement, isn't it? ¿no estás generalizando demasiado? he often made sweeping generalizations a menudo caía en burdas generalizaciones
    More example sentences
    • The only possible exception to this sweeping statement would be Karl Marx - and Marx himself was heavily influenced by Hegel.
    • Making a generalised and sweeping statement on every politician and the whole system was an irresponsible act.
    • There was a general sweeping statement, because, of course, it does not have the World Health Organization findings.
    1.3 (overwhelming) [victory] arrollador, aplastante 1.4 (far-reaching) [reforms/changes] radical; [powers] amplio
    More example sentences
    • The government plans to give sweeping powers to a wide range of organisations to spy on us.
    • Berlusconi then reverted to his normal strategy by pleading for several more years to put into effect the sweeping reforms he had promised on his election.
    • There is a well-known method for examining deaths involving a range of sweeping issues - the provincial inquest system.

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Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.