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swipe

Pronunciation: /swaɪp/

Translation of swipe in Spanish:

noun/nombre

[colloquial/familiar]
  • 1.1 (blow) golpe (masculine) to take a swipe at sb/sth intentar darle or pegarle a algn/algo
    Example sentences
    • Justin turned aside the blow with a quick swipe, and countered with a low sweep, hoping to get Timothy to jump over the blade.
    • His upward swipe countered the first two's downward blows.
    • The officer, a commander by the looks of it, parried his blow before attempting another swipe.
    1.2 (verbal attack) ataque (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • In accepting the award, he paid tribute to the role fans played in turning his movies into a success and took a swipe at critics in the process.
    • He took a swipe at earlier press reports which claimed he would take advantage of the company and sell the properties as soon as he could after the two-year period to pocket profits.
    • He took a swipe at the Democratic candidates yesterday who want to roll back his cuts, claiming the reductions have fuelled a broad economic recovery in the US.

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

[colloquial/familiar]
  • 1 (hit) darle* (un golpe) a
  • 2 (steal) afanarse [slang/argot], volarse* (Mexico/México) [colloquial/familiar]

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • to swipe at sth/sb intentar darle or pegarle a algo/algn it swiped at him with its claws le dio un zarpazo

Definition of swipe in:

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Sherry is produced in an area of chalky soil known as albariza lying between the towns of Puerto de Santa María, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and Jerez de la Frontera in Cádiz province. It is from Jerez that sherry takes its English name. Sherries, made from grape varieties including Palomino and Pedro Ximénez, are drunk worldwide as an aperitif, and in Spain as an accompaniment to tapas. The styles of jerez vary from the pale fino and manzanilla to the darker aromatic oloroso and amontillado.