Translation of take away in Spanish:

take away

  • 1verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento 1.1 (carry away) llevarse he took the empty dishes away retiró or se llevó los platos vacíos not to be taken away (on book) para consulta en sala 1.2 (lead off) [person] llevarse 1.3 (remove, confiscate) [possession] quitar, sacar* (Southern Cone/Cono Sur) to take away sb's hopes quitarle las esperanzas a algn to take sth away from sb quitarle or (in Southern Cone also/en Cono Sur también) sacarle* algo a algn he took the ball away from the children les quitó la pelota a los niños her children were taken away from her le quitaron a los niños they took their children away from the school sacaron a los niños del colegio 1.4 (erase, obliterate) this will take the pain/taste away con esto se te pasará or se te quitará el dolor/gusto nothing can take away my memories of that trip nada me puede quitar el recuerdo de aquel viaje 1.5 [Mathematics/Matemáticas] 34 take away 13 equals 21 34 menos 13 es igual a 21 if you take away 13 from 34 … si a 34 le restas 13 …
  • 2verb + object + adverb/verbo + complemento + adverbio take it away! [colloquial/familiar] ¡adelante!
  • 3verb + adverb + object/verbo + adverbio + complemento (British English/inglés británico) [food] llevar to eat here or take away? ¿para comer aquí o para llevar?
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.