There are 2 translations of takeaway in Spanish:

takeaway1

Pronunciation: /ˈteɪkəweɪ/

adj

  • (BrE) para llevar; [restaurant] de comida para llevar

Definition of takeaway in:

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Word of the day mandado
adj
es muy mandado = he's a real opportunist …
Cultural fact of the day

The RAE (Real Academia de la Lengua Española) is a body established in the eighteenth century to record and preserve the Spanish language. It is made up of académicos, who are normally well-known literary figures and/or academic experts on the Spanish language. The RAE publishes the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, which is regarded as an authority on correct Spanish. Affiliated academies exist in Latin American countries.

There are 2 translations of takeaway in Spanish:

takeaway2

n

(BrE)
  • 1.1 (restaurant) restaurante (m) de comida para llevar
    More example sentences
    • Almost half the weight of some chicken sold through restaurants and takeaways is made up of water and food additives, according to an investigation.
    • He works seven nights a week delivering food for a Chinese restaurant and a pizza takeaway.
    • Currently in the High Street there are two Indian takeaways, two fish and chip shops, a Chinese takeaway and a pizza takeaway.
    1.2 (meal) comida (f) preparada we had a takeaway compramos comida para llevar
    More example sentences
    • Many of today's young people, existing on takeaways or meals taken out of the freezer and bunged in the microwave, complain about the cost of things.
    • But despite feeding ready meals and takeaways to their children parents are eating far less of them - on average just 64 ready meals each a year.
    • About once a fortnight, I eat a fatty takeaway for dinner: fish and chips, Chinese, kebabs.

Definition of takeaway in:

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Word of the day mandado
adj
es muy mandado = he's a real opportunist …
Cultural fact of the day

The RAE (Real Academia de la Lengua Española) is a body established in the eighteenth century to record and preserve the Spanish language. It is made up of académicos, who are normally well-known literary figures and/or academic experts on the Spanish language. The RAE publishes the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, which is regarded as an authority on correct Spanish. Affiliated academies exist in Latin American countries.