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tangle
American English: /ˈtæŋɡəl/
British English: /ˈtaŋɡ(ə)l/

Translation of tangle in Spanish:

transitive verb

  • 1.1

    tangle (up)

    (threads/wool)
    the bird had tangled itself (up) in the net
    el pájaro se había enredado en la red
    to get tangled (up)
    enredarse
    my hair got tangled (up)
    se me enredó el pelo
    Example sentences
    • Soon the rings and cans get all tangled together, and you have a huge mess inside the cooler.
    • Her hair hung in clumps down her back, tangled together and being blown in the wind.
    • We liked to think that the story of Australia is not one, but many tangled together.
    1.2 (muddle, confuse) (usually passive) the situation has become even more tangled
    las cosas están todavía más enredadas
    a tangled affair
    un asunto enredado or complicado
    Example sentences
    • Unsurprisingly, nothing is what it seems as his play tangles its way to a quadruple-cross conclusion.
    • The communications industry is becoming an increasingly tangled web.
    • Like the whole tangled story of the casa nostra, the new Mafia museum contains more secrets than meets the eye.

intransitive verb

  • (threads/rope)
    enredarse

noun

  • 1.1 (of threads, hair)
    (of weeds, undergrowth)
    I tried to comb the tangles out of my hair
    traté de desenredarme el pelo
    the ropes lay in a tangle on the floor
    las cuerdas estaban hechas una maraña or un enredo en el suelo
    how did your hair get into such a tangle?
    ¿cómo se te ha enredado tanto el pelo?
    1.2 (muddle, confusion) to get into a tangle
    armarse un lío
    I'm in such a tangle with these forms
    tengo un enredo or [colloquial] lío con estos formularios
    the tangle of bureaucracy
    la maraña burocrática
    Example sentences
    • The reason for the delay is the mess ministers are making of the terrible tangle of complicated regulations in an already rotten piece of legislation.
    • The real evil is the muddle, the tangle of evasions, words, intrigues by which he instinctively seeks to dodge reality.
    • I'm sure a few of you may be getting individual mails about this at some point in the future, but it's a complicated tangle, and I really don't want to go there.
    1.3 (dispute) [colloquial]
    Example sentences
    • It is left to India and China, who have in the past, frittered away their most creative energies in wars and conflicts to rise above their tangles and claim the economic leadership that he is fast abandoning.
    • However, since May 2000 the company has been mothballed over ongoing legal tussles and tangles.
    • Akin to the Rapunzel character in the classic Grimm fairy tale, the long tresses of this 12th class student from Kollam nearly got her into a serious tangle.
    Example sentences
    • His brown hair was an unruly mass of tangles and knots.
    • As always when she woke up, her hair was a mass of tangles.
    • Her hair was a mass of tangles, sand and sweat caked to her scalp.

Phrasal verbs

tangle up

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object
1.1 (confuse) See examples: he got terribly tangled up trying to explain himself
se hizo un enredo or [colloquial] lío tratando de explicarse
1.2 (involve, embroil) (usually passive) to get tangled up in something
verse implicado en algo
1.3tangle 1 1

tangle with

verb + preposition + object
[colloquial]he's dangerous: I wouldn't tangle with him!
es peligroso, yo que tú no me metería con él
having tangled with him before, I trod warily
como ya había lidiado con él, me anduve con pie de plomo

Definition of tangle in:

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    Cultural fact of the day

    onces

    In some Andean countries, particularly Chile, onces is a light meal eaten between five and six p.m., the equivalent of "afternoon tea" in Britain. In Colombia, on the other hand, onces is a light snack eaten between breakfast and lunch. It is also known as mediasnueves.