Translation of tariff in Spanish:

tariff

Pronunciation: /ˈtærəf; ˈtærɪf/

noun/nombre

  • 1 (price list) (British English/inglés británico) tarifa (feminine) postal/railway tariff tarifa postal/ferroviaria bar tariff lista (feminine) de precios ([ de un bar ])
  • 2 [Economics/Economía] arancel (masculine) (aduanero); (before noun/delante del nombre) [restrictions/preference] arancelario tariff barrier o wall barrera (feminine) arancelaria
    More example sentences
    • The introduction of Value Added Tax in July 1999 enabled the government to remove tariffs and import duties.
    • Both export taxes and import tariffs are used as policy tools to regulate cotton markets.
    • Excises, tariffs, export duties, and taxes on particular goods have become relatively insignificant sources of state revenues in these advanced nations.
    More example sentences
    • Port tariffs are essentially price lists that encompass all the services and facilities provided by a port.
    • "The tariff explicitly lists agro-machinery that enjoys duty free status, and our officers are guided by this tabulation," he said.
    More example sentences
    • Technology Telecom says its customers can save 20 per cent compared to BT's business tariffs and a 5 per cent discount on BT line charges.
    • Some hotels have lowered their tariffs by between 30 and 50 per cent.
    • Orange is marketing the SPV M1000 at business users, with calls and GPRS data connections billed according to the network's business tariffs.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.