There are 3 translations of thin in Spanish:

thin1

Pronunciation: /θɪn/

adj (-nn-)

  • 1 1.1 [layer/slice/wall/ice] delgado, fino the sweater had worn very thin at the elbows el suéter tenía los codos muy (des)gastados my patience was wearing thin se me estaba acabando la paciencia 1.2 (not fat) [person/body/arm] delgado, flaco; [waist] delgado, fino to get/grow thin adelgazar*
  • 2 2.1 (in consistency) [soup/sauce] claro, poco espeso, chirle (RPl) ; [wine] de poco cuerpo 2.2 (not dense) [mist/rain] fino; [hair] ralo, fino y poco abundante; [hedge] poco tupido at the top the air is thin en la cima el aire está enrarecido you're getting a bit thin on top [colloquial/familiar] te estás quedando calvo or (CS) [familiar/colloquial] pelado 2.3 (small) [crowd/audience] poco numeroso; [response/attendance] escaso
  • 3 3.1 (weak, poor) [voice] débil; [excuse/argument/disguise] pobre, poco convincente; [profits] magro, escaso the team has had a thin season no ha sido una temporada muy buena para el equipo 3.2 (harsh) to have a thin time of it [colloquial/familiar] vérselas negras [familiar/colloquial], pasarlas canutas or moradas (Esp) [familiar/colloquial]

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 3 translations of thin in Spanish:

thin2

adv

  • to cut sth thin cortar algo en rebanadas ( or capas etc) delgadas spread the jam thin extienda or ponga una capa fina de mermelada, ponga poca mermelada

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 3 translations of thin in Spanish:

thin3

(-nn-)

vt

  • [paint] diluir*, rebajar; [sauce] aclarar, hacer* menos espeso; [hair/plants] entresacar* their ranks were thinned perdieron hombres ( or partidarios etc), sus filas se vieron mermadas

vi

  • [paint] diluirse*; [audience/traffic] disminuir* the fog was beginning to thin (out) la niebla empezaba a irse or a disiparse his hair is thinning está perdiendo pelo

Phrasal verbs

thin down

v + adv (become slimmer) adelgazar* 1.1v + o + adv, v + adv + o [sauce/soup] hacer* menos espeso, aclarar; [paint] diluir*

thin out

v + adv [traffic] disminuir*; [forest] hacerse* ralo or menos denso; [audience] mermar his hair was beginning to thin out estaba empezando a perder el pelo, su pelo estaba empezando a ralear 1.1v + o + adv, v + adv + o [hair/plants] entresacar*

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.