There are 2 translations of veneer in Spanish:

veneer1

Pronunciation: /vəˈnɪr; vɪˈnɪə(r)/

n

  • 1.1 uncountable or countable/no numerable o numerable (of wood, gold) enchapado (m), chapa (f) a marble veneer un revestimiento imitación mármol
    More example sentences
    • Much of today's furniture is made with a thin wood veneer over a core of particleboard, and this material also will rapidly absorb water.
    • Then, make your pencil lines and cut on the back of the panel to avoid splintering the veneer with your circular saw.
    • With a new blade in a utility knife, score the veneer front then back, flush with the stile on all edges; and bend it to complete the cut.
    1.2 uncountable/no numerable (outer appearance) veneer of sth capa (f) or barniz (m)de algo a veneer of sophistication un barniz de sofisticación
    More example sentences
    • This story has taken on the image and the veneer of a fable and we are simply following the fable to its logical conclusion.
    • Think about the thin veneer of civilization for a moment, and ask yourself how you would respond to chaos.
    • Then the vocals kick in, stripping the veneer of respectability and reminding anyone who they are listening to.

Definition of veneer in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of veneer in Spanish:

veneer2

Definition of veneer in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.