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veto

Pronunciation: /ˈviːtəʊ/

Translation of veto in Spanish:

noun/nombre (plural vetoes)

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (power to ban) veto (masculine) the right of veto el derecho de or al veto to have a veto tener* derecho de veto to use o exercise one's veto ejercer* el veto to invoke a veto acogerse* al or invocar* el derecho de or al veto
    Example sentences
    • From this perspective, the U.S. Senate has a veto over treaties negotiated by the executive, and constitutional courts have a veto over legislation.
    • Clearly the present set-up gives the five major powers on the Security Council a veto on any decisions taken by UN member states.
    • It had its own assembly and militia, the power of veto over federal decisions and control of education and other public services.
    1.2 countable/numerable (ban) veto (masculine), prohibición (feminine) to put a veto on sth vetar algo
    Example sentences
    • Few people want children - or, for that matter, anyone else - to have veto power over the decisions that parents make.
    • Now we don't have to really divide or to make vetoes on people.
    • The Cardinal had tried to impose an immediate veto on all contacts with the media.
    1.3 countable/numerable veto (message) (in US)[ exposición de las razones por las que se ha ejercido el derecho de veto ]

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (vetoes, vetoing, vetoed)

  • [bill/measure/proposal] vetar his wife has vetoed smoking in the kitchen su mujer ha prohibido que se fume en la cocina

Definition of veto in:

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Word of the day llanero
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.