There are 2 translations of visionary in Spanish:

visionary1

Pronunciation: /ˈvɪʒəneri; ˈvɪʒənri/

adj

  • 1.1 (farsighted) [leader/plan] con visión de futuro
    More example sentences
    • The film is based around Isaac Asimov's visionary stories about future technology where robots are an integral part of our daily lives.
    • I marvelled at the imaginative energy of the Martian enterprise, at its visionary and dogged inventiveness.
    • He hopes to see the gains achieved by the U.S. civil rights movement, and maybe even a vision of ideal universal equality, reflected in the visionary future of the Federation.
    1.2 (unrealistic) utópico
    More example sentences
    • The book ends with an assault by the mob on Mr Chainmail's 12th-cent. castle, an ironic comment on the more visionary schemes to solve the troubles of the age of reform.
    • ‘These hypothetical, visionary schemes will only act to deter tenants from investing in their businesses,’ he said.

Definition of visionary in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.

There are 2 translations of visionary in Spanish:

visionary2

n (pl -ries)

  • 1.1 (dreamer) visionario, -ria (m,f) 1.2 (seer) iluminado, -da (m,f), visionario, -ria (m,f)

Definition of visionary in:

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Word of the day rigor
m
rigor (US), rigour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

Santería is a religious cult, fusing African beliefs and Catholicism, which developed among African Yoruba slaves in Cuba. Followers believe both in a single supreme being and also in orishas, deities who each share an identity with a Christian saint and who combine a force of nature with human characteristics. Rituals involve music, dancing, sacrificial offerings, divination, and going into trances.