Translation of wassail in Spanish:

wassail

Pronunciation: /ˈwɑːseɪl; ˈwɑːsəl; ˈwɒseɪl; ˈwɒsl/

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

[archaic] [humorous/humorístico]
  • 1 (drink alcohol) montar* una juerga [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • They dominate nearly half the tavern's area, loudly drinking, singing, boxing, and otherwise wassailing to the extent that almost nothing else can be heard or done by others.
    • After 1800, this Christmas misrule took on a nastier tone, as young and alienated working-class New Yorkers began to use wassailing as a form of rambling riot, sometimes invading people's homes and vandalizing their property.
    • Before enclosures, festivals were vigorously convivial; they were ‘off-licence’ times, drunken, licentious and rude, from midsummer ales to apple-tree wassailing, to May Day's liaisons.
    More example sentences
    • It's a general description of nineteenth-century English Christmas customs, including wassailing and guising, apparently taken from published accounts.
    • Every man, woman and child seems to be out wassailing - bar one.
    • It's an old tradition, which, along with wassailing and mumming, we have performed over the years in and around Skipton, and many people, especially those young in heart, enjoy the music and dance in which all are invited to participate.
  • 2 (sing carols) cantar villancicos

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.