Translation of web in Spanish:

web

Pronunciation: /web/

noun/nombre

  • 1
    (spider's web)
    1.1 telaraña (feminine) the spider spins its web la araña teje su tela 1.2 (of cloth) tejido (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Every woman made her web and bleached it herself, and the price never rose higher than 2 shillings a yard, and with this cloth almost everyone was clothed.
    • I need not remind my readers of the connection always maintained in classical poetry and legend between the spider and the weaver, the spinner and the web. Even in our vernacular we speak of ‘the web’ on the loom, and the fable of Arachne has blended itself with almost all thought on the subject.
    1.3 (structure) a web of intrigue una red de intriga a web of lies una maraña de mentiras
  • 2 (on bird's, frog's foot) membrana (feminine) interdigital
    More example sentences
    • Then, as the duck draws its foot forward and brings the toes together, the web folds up so there is less resistance to the water.
    • His feet are rather large, but the web is not wide as in ducks.
  • 3 [Computing/Informática] the Web oweb la or el web World Wide Web telaraña (feminine) mundial
    More example sentences
    • Almost half of all the Danish Internet population are using the Web for banking and tax purposes.
    • Thankfully, when it all gets too much, the Web has some quick fixes for my addiction.
    • Again and again, the history of the Web shows us the value of relinquishing control.

Definition of web in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.