Translation of whisker in Spanish:

whisker

Pronunciation: /ˈhwɪskər; ˈwɪskə(r)/

noun/nombre

  • 1 1.1 countable/numerable (single hair) pelo (masculine) ([ de la barba ]) 1.2 (narrow margin) (no plural/sin plural) pelo (masculine) he lost the race by a whisker perdió la carrera por un pelo or por poquísimo they came within a whisker of … faltó un pelo or faltó muy poco para que …
    More example sentences
    • I intuit Blair will win the election by a whisker.
    • This year, for example, the amount given to Republicans is just a whisker more than $1 million.
    • This release just missed the cut on the last missive by a whisker and a bit.
  • 2
    (whiskers plural)
    2.1 (of animal) bigotes (masculine plural) 2.2 [dated/anticuado] (mustache) bigote(s) (masculine (plural)); (sideburns) patillas (feminine plural)
    More example sentences
    • The examiner was a Dr Bull, an elderly anatomy lecturer of rather Victorian appearance, with mutton-chop whiskers and beetling eyebrows.
    • Since the mustache part of General Burnside's invention was nothing new, the cheek whiskers became known as ‘Burnsides’ and enjoyed a certain vogue among men of the day.
    • The Emperor Franz Josef favoured equally luxuriant mutton-chop whiskers - effectively a beard, with the chin shaven.
    More example sentences
    • Every once in a while, particularly when I take out clothes that I haven't worn since our move, I find a cat whisker or a dog hair.
    • Another notable mode of sensation in cats are whiskers, or vibrissae.
    • It has a nose like a dog's, teeth like a leopard's, and whiskers like an otter's.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.