Translation of alegrar in English:

alegrar

verbo transitivo/transitive verb

verbo pronominal/pronominal verb (alegrarse)

  • 1.1 (ponerse feliz, contento) me alegro tanto por ti I'm so happy for you está mucho mejor — me alegro, déle saludos míos she's much better — that's good o/or I'm glad, give her my best wishes se alegró muchísimo cuando lo vio she was really happy when she saw him ¡cuánto me alegro! I'm so happy o/or pleased! nos alegramos tanto con la noticia we were so pleased at the news alegrarse de algo to be glad o/or pleased about sth se alegró de nuestra victoria she was glad o pleased about our win o that we had won se alegran de las desgracias ajenas they take pleasure in other people's misfortunes alegrarse de + infinitivo/infinitive to be pleased to + infinitivo/infinitive se alegró de recibir la carta she was pleased o/or glad to get the letter me alegro de verte it's good o/or nice to see you ¿no te alegras de haber venido? aren't you glad o/or pleased you came?alegrarse de que + subjuntivo/subjunctive me alegro de que todo haya salido bien I'm glad o/or pleased that everything went well 1.2 (animarse) to cheer up ¡vamos! ¡alégrate! si no es para tanto come on, cheer up! it's not that bad 1.3 (por el alcohol) to get tipsy [familiar/colloquial], to get merry (inglés británico/British English) [familiar/colloquial]

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.