Translation of colgar in English:

colgar

vt

vi

  • 1 (pender) to hang el vestido me cuelga de un lado my dress is hanging down on one side o is hanging unevenly llevas un hilo colgando de la chaqueta there's a loose thread hanging off o from your jacket una araña de cristal colgaba del centro de la habitación a crystal chandelier hung from the center of the room adelgazó mucho y ahora le cuelgan las carnes she lost a lot of weight and now her skin just hangs off her lleva dos asignaturas colgando [argot/slang] he has two retakes to do, he has two exams to make up hilo
  • 2 [Telec] to hang up no cuelgue, por favor hold the line please o please hold me ha colgado he's hung up on me, he's put the phone down on me

colgarse v pron

(refl)
  • 2 (agarrarse, suspenderse)colgarse de algo te he dicho mil veces que no te cuelgues de ahí I've told you a thousand times not to hang off there no te cuelgues de mí, estoy cansada don't cling on o hang on to me, I'm tired se le colgó del cuello y le dio un beso he put his arms around her neck and gave her a kiss se pasó la tarde colgada del teléfono [familiar/colloquial] she spent all afternoon on the phone
  • 3 (Chi) 3.1 [Telec] se colgaron al satélite they linked up with the satellite varios canales se colgaron de la transmisión several channels took the broadcast 3.2 [Elec] se cuelgan del suministro eléctrico they tap into the electricity supply

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