Translation of manga in English:

manga

nombre femenino/feminine noun

  • 1 [Indumentaria/Clothing] sleeve un vestido sin mangas a sleeveless dress camisas de manga corta/larga short-sleeved/long-sleeved shirts manga tres cuartos three-quarter (length) sleeve en mangas de camisa in shirtsleeves estar manga por hombro [familiar/colloquial] [casa] to be upside-down o topsy-turvy o in a mess [familiar/colloquial] un país donde todo anda manga por hombro a country where everything is in a state of chaos sacarse algo de la manga, esa definición se la ha sacado de la manga he's just made that definition up (off the top of his head) se sacó una buena respuesta de la manga she came up with a good answer off the top of her head ser más corto que las mangas de un chaleco [familiar/colloquial] (burro) to be really dumb [familiar/colloquial], to be as thick as two short planks (inglés británico/British English) [familiar/colloquial] (tímido) to be very shy tener (la) manga ancha to be easygoing tirarle la manga a algn (Río de la Plata/River Plate area) [familiar/colloquial] to ask sb for money, to touch sb for money [familiar/colloquial] cada vez que viene le tira la manga a la madre every time he comes he asks o/or touches his mother for money

    Compounds

    manga abombada

    manga de jamón

    manga dolman

    manga japonesa

    manga murciélago

    manga raglan

    manga ranglan

  • 5 [Botánica/Botany][ type of mango ]
  • 7 [Meteorología/Meteorology] 7.1 (remolino) tb manga de agua waterspout (chaparrón) squally shower 7.2 (torbellino) tb manga de viento whirlwind
  • 11 (Colombia) [familiar/colloquial] (persona fuerte) es chiquito pero es una manga he's small but he's very tough

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.